Welcome to the United Nations

Home > Action Areas > Data availability (including disaggregation) and adequacy > Open data

Open data

To promote data dissemination and transparency globally, the IMF introduced in May 2015 the enhanced General Data Dissemination System (e-GDDS). It aims to have countries produce fully operational National Summary Data Page (NSDP), supported by modern IT technology and covering the real, fiscal, monetary and financial, and external sectors. The dissemination of supplementary statistics, including demographic and socio economic indicators, such as those required to monitor progress under the Sustainable Development Goals, is also encouraged. The implementation of the e GDDS is rapidly gaining speed. As of January 2017, eleven African countries and one Central American country have developed their new NSDPs. Other examples of open data in the development field include civil society initiatives such as gapminder and the Humanitarian Data Exchange. At the sub-national level, there are examples of local governments that have made vast amounts of data available online for research and policy.

The World Bank has been providing technical assistance and capacity building for developing countries’ Open Data programs since 2012. The Bank publishes and continually updates an Open Data Toolkit that provides a set of curated resources for initiating or deepening an open data program. The tools include basic explanation of what open data is; advice on open data licensing and technology options, training opportunities, research, examples of apps and other uses of open data by sector and many other similar tools. Some of these tools have been developed by the World Bank, but the large majority have been developed by other institutions.
 
The Bank is a funder and founding member of the Open Data for Development (OD4D) program, along with the Canadian Government the International Development Research Center and DFID. The OD4D network includes a large number of national and international organizations working to advance open Data in developing countries, who are responsible for the implementation of the annual OD4D program of activities (technical assistance, training, research, workshops and similar).
As part of its Data Standards Initiatives to promote data dissemination and transparency globally, the IMF introduced in May 2015 the enhanced General Data Dissemination System (e-GDDS) to supersede the predecessor GDDS. The most important objective of this new initiative is to produce a fully operational National Summary Data Page (NSDP), supported by modern IT technology and covering the real, fiscal, monetary and financial, and external sectors. Supplementary statistics, including demographic and socio economic indicators, such as those required to monitor progress under the Sustainable Development Goals, are also encouraged to be disseminated. The implementation of the e GDDS is rapidly gaining speed. As of January 2017, eleven African countries (Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Swaziland Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia) and one Central American country (Honduras) have developed their new NSDPs which are now linked to the IMF’s Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB). In August 2016, a draft e-GDDS Guide for Participants and Users was published on the DSBB to provide practical information about the e-GDDS.